Latest News

Warrant against Aristide suspended pending an investigation of judge Belizaire (Two articles)

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The courts in Haiti's new dictatorship

By Justin Podur, telesurtv.net, August 28, 2014

On August 12, a court in Haiti summoned former President Jean Bertrand Aristide to appear on charges of corruption. Aristide's lawyers quickly filed a motion with the Supreme Court seeking the recusal of the judge who issued the warrant. Lawyer Mario Joseph, from the Institute for Justice and Democracy in Haiti, accused judge Lamarre Belizaire of engaging in a political trial, bringing baseless accusations forward, violating due process in the way Aristide was informed of the summons (through the press), and questioning the process by which the case came to be under Belizaire's jurisdiction.

OAS urges Haiti to hold elections

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By the Caribbean Journal staff, caribjournal.com, August 28, 2014

The Organization of American States’ Permanent Council has adopted a declaration urging Haiti’s government to hold long-delayed legislative and municipal elections by the end of this year.

The OAS declaration called on Haiti’s three branches of government to comply with the El Rancho agreement that was reached earlier this year.

The elections have been delayed for nearly three years.

Stop the attacks on former Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide and the Lavalas Movement

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By Haiti Action Committee, San Francisco Bay Review August 17, 2014

On Aug. 13, the Haitian government summoned former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide to court on corruption charges. This summons is part of a chilling pattern of repression aimed at destroying Aristide’s political party, Fanmi Lavalas, as the country approaches new legislative elections. We denounce it in the strongest possible terms. 

Supporters Of Haiti’s Former President Try To Block His Arrest (Radio interview)

Supporters of former Haitian President Jean Bertrand Aristide hold pictures of Aristide during a protest outside his residence on August 21, 2014 in Port-au-Prince to prevent any attempt to arrest him..jpg

By Jacqueline Charles, Here & Now, August 22, 2014

Hundreds of supporters of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide took to the street after a judge ordered his arrest. Aristide, who returned to his country in 2011 after seven years in exile, has been accused of corruption and drug trafficking.

Aristide is not the only former president to have return to Haiti from exile. Jean-Claude Duvalier, nicknamed “Baby Doc,” was in self-imposed exile in France for years. He also returned to Haiti in 2011.

Haitian moms demand UN help for the babies their peacekeepers left behind

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When the US military pulled out of Vietnam in 1973, it left something of a living legacy: Tens of thousands of pregnant Vietnamese women. But this issue is not confined to Americans in Vietnam, or even to wartime. It’s also an often overlooked side effect of United Nations peacekeeping operations.

By Amy Bracken, Public Radio International, August 29, 2014

Aristide Warrant and Brandt Prison Break Overshadow Election Derailment

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By Kim Ives, Haiti Liberté, August 20, 2014

Last week, Haitian demonstrators erected barricades of burning tires and car frames in front of former President Jean-Bertrand Aristide's home in Tabarre to prevent the government of President Michel Martelly from arresting him. On Aug. 12, investigating Judge Lamarre Bélizaire had issued a court summons for Aristide to come to his offices for questioning the next day, Aug. 13. Aristide never received the last-minute summons which was allegedly left at his gate, according to his lawyer Mario Joseph. 

Indigenous Mayans in Guatemala take Canadian mining company Hudbay to court (Three articles)

Rosa Eblira Coc Inh, one of the plaintiffs. (Photo by Roger LeMoyne).jpg

Mining for the truth in Guatemala 

What lawsuits claiming rape and murder in a Guatemalan jungle mean for Canadian companies abroad 

By Melinda Maldonado, Macleans.ca, July 8, 2014